“I might be just one person but I think just one person participating makes a difference.” This is the power of the people.

From Spongebob memes to walk outs and marches, the younger generation has been very vocal about gun regulations. Using various social media platforms such as Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat to point out the issue of how easy it is to be able to own an assault weapon.

Without the interference of adults, many teenagers planned a walkout on March 14 in the memory of the February 14th shooting victims.

Students from different regions of the country walked out of their school for 17 minutes, some made posters, inspirational speeches, and some were silent to show respect to the deceased.

On March 24th, the March for Our Lives gathered teens to Washington D.C.. Thanks to Catholic Charities, 95 people from Media and Communications including students, staff, parents and community members were able to experience the march. Elizabeth Payero, a guidance counselor at Media, described the march as “powerful” and “positive.”

“The march was amazing because it sent the strong message that young people had the power to have a voice and make a change to gun laws,” Payero said.

Juniors Nile Garcia and Alex Florian also attended the march to voice their opinions. Florian said, “I don’t want guns to vanish, I just want better gun laws.”

Garcia said, just like his sign, he wants “Gun Reform Now!”

Besides the young marchers, the event also had young orators on the stage motivating the participants to take action.

“In my opinion MLK granddaughter’s speech was really powerful and eye opening,” said Garcia.

The granddaughter of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is Yolanda Renee King. In her speech, she shared, “Spread the word. Have you heard? All across the nation. We are going to be a great generation.”

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Media students and community participants join the March for Our Lives in Washington D.C. (Jaylene Then/Class of 2018)

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The George Washington Educational Campus community show their support for ending gun violence. (Jaylene Then/Class of 2018)